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The Roman Expeditions of the Nile River

Between 62 and 67 AD the Roman emperor Nero sent a small group of Praetorian guards to explore the sources of the Nile River in Africa.

According to most scholars, the expedition was organized to obtain information for a possible conquest of Ethiopia.

Related: The cities founded by the Romans, Amazing Pompeii images, Ancient Pagan Temple of Diana

Weird Italy roman-Exotic-animal-transportation The Roman Expeditions of the Nile River Italian History  romans roman history roman empire Nile river nero Egypt Africa
Exotic animal transportation, Villa del Casale, Piazza Armerina, Sicily, Italy. Rare scene of two separate events on a single tableau, a common narrative technique in Roman visual arts.

It is part of a series of expeditions, conducted between 19 a.C. and 86 AD, aimed at the exploration and acquisition of control of the caravan routes through the Sahara, which guaranteed trade between the Mediterranean coast and sub-Saharan Africa; among these, the Roman expedition towards Lake Chad and the river Niger.

Around 62 d.C. Seneca wrote that Nero had sent some legionaries to the city of Meroe in Nubia, in order to explore the south of that capital. This expedition was commissioned by the Roman emperor to obtain information on equatorial Africa and its possible riches.

Weird Italy Nero-exploration-of-Nile-river The Roman Expeditions of the Nile River Italian History  romans roman history roman empire Nile river nero Egypt Africa

Seneca

“Are you unaware that among the various” theories explaining how the summer flooding of the Nile occurs there is this one: that the river gushes of the earth and rises with water not from above but from deep within? I heard two centurions whom Nero Caesar, great lover of the other virtues and especially of truth, had sent to search for the source of the Nile. They told how they made a long journey, when they were provided with assistance by the king of Ethiopia, were given recommendations to the neighboring kings, and penetrated further inland. “Then,” they said, “we reached interminable marshlands. The local people had not discovered where they ended, nor can anyone hope to do so: weeds are so entangled with the water and the water “with weeds”, they are impassable either on foot or by boat; only a small, one-man craft can manage on the muddy, overgrown swamp. There, “he said, “we saw two crags from whhich a huge volume of river water cascaded down.” Whether that is the source of the Nile or a tributary, whether it first emerges there or returns to the surface after being swallowed underground in its earlier course, do you not believe that this water, whatever it is, rises from a great lake within the earts? For the earth must contain liquid, both dispersed in many places and concentrated in a single place, to be able to disgorge it with such force. Seneca, Natural Questions, Book VI, On Earthquakes, 8.1, pag. 96-96. L. Annaei Senecae Naturalium quaestionum

In a 1996 article published in the magazine Nigrizia, Giovanni Vantini, a scholar belonging to the order of the Comboni fathers, identified in Meroe the city where the Romans met the king of Ethiopia. According to him, the description of the swamp made by the centurions is a clear reference to the lake No, formed by the confluence of the Bahr el Ghazal with the white Nile.

According to Vantini the expedition possibly arrived also in Ugandan territory, interpreting as a reference to the Murchison Falls, known in the past as Kabalega, the following passage reported by Seneca “We have seen two rocks, from which the force of the river escaped with power “(Ibi, inquit, uidimus duas petras, ex quibus ingens uis fluminis excidebat). The description given by Seneca still corresponds today, according to the Comboni scholar Father Giovanni Vantini, at Lake No, an immense swamp, 2-5 meters deep, formed by the confluence of the river Bahr el Ghazal with the Nile coming from the Equator. The scenario would be that of the Murchison Falls, today Kabalega, where the Nile coming from Lake Victoria, plunges into Lake Albert, with a jump of 100 meters, in a gorge of just 60-70 meters. Some historians, like the great Meroitist F. Hintze, even believe that Nero sent two successive expeditions, because the first of 61 AD, reported by Seneca, speaks of a “king of Ethiopia” who “provided aid and commendatizie” to the centurions. ; the other of 66-67, reported by Pliny, instead mentions a queen (Candace).

Weird Italy the-great-hunt-villa-casale The Roman Expeditions of the Nile River Italian History  romans roman history roman empire Nile river nero Egypt Africa
Roman mosaic at Villa del Casale, Sicily. Author: Urban

Pliny the elder

Another expedition, recorded by Pliny the Elder in 67, was probably intended to gather information for a possible conquest by Nero of what is now Sudan.

These are the names of places given as far as Meroë: but at the present day hardly any of them on either side of the river are in existence; at all events, the prætorian troops that were sent by the Emperor Nero under the command of a tribune, for the purposes of enquiry, when, among his other wars, he was contemplating an expedition against Æthiopia, brought back word that they had met with nothing but deserts on their route. The Roman arms also penetrated into these regions in the time of the late Emperor Augustus, under the command of P. Petronius, a man of Equestrian rank, and prefect of Egypt. That general took the following cities, the only ones we now find mentioned there, in the following order; Pselcis, Primis, Abuncis, Phthuris, Cambusis, Atteva, and Stadasis, where the river Nile, as it thunders down the precipices, has quite deprived the in- habitants of the power of hearing: he also sacked the town of Napata. The extreme distance to which he penetrated beyond Syene was nine hundred and seventy miles; but still.

Pliny the elder, Naturalis Historia, Liber VI, XXXV, 181

But all this difference is lately determined by the Report of those Travellers whom Nero sent to Discover those Countries, who have related that it is 862 Miles from Syene in this manner : from Syene to Hiera-Sycaminon, Fifty-four Miles ; from thence to Tama, Seventy-five Miles ; from Tama to the Euonymites Country, the first of the Ethiopians, 120 ; to Acina, Fifty-four; to Pitara, Twenty-five; to Tergedum, 106 Miles. That in the midst of this Tract lieth the Island Gagandus, where they first saw the Birds called Parrots; and beyond another Island called Attigula they saw Monkeys ; beyond Tergedum they met with the Creatures Cynocephali. From thence to Napata Eighty Miles, which is the only little Town among all the beforenamed ; from which to the Island Meroe is 360 Miles. They reported, moreover, that about Meroe, and not before, the Herbs appeared greener ; and the Woods shewed somewhat in comparison of all the way besides ; and they espied the Tracts of Elephants and Rhinoceroses.

Pliny the elder, Natural history, book VI

Images: 1 , 2 , 3 (from Le Musée absolu, Phaidon, 10-2012)

Three amazing Roman Villas reopened in Pompeii

Three large and majestic Roman domus (villas) have been restored and will be reopened to the public by Easter: Home of Triptolemus, the House of Romulus and Remus and the House of Marco Lucrezio Frontone.

Continue reading Three amazing Roman Villas reopened in Pompeii

30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii

The cataclysmic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD was one of the most spectacular and destructive event in ancient history.

Weird Italy campania 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD   Two towns and many other villas around the area, were completely destroyed and buried under 4 to 6 m of pumice and ash.

Incredible plaster casts of victims and buildings well preserved give us more than a glimpse about Roman way of life.
Pompeii was lost for about 1,500 years until its rediscovery in 1599 and broader rediscovery 150 years later by Spanish engineer Rocque Joaquin de Alcubierre in 1748.

Pompeii: The Mystery Of People Frozen In Time – BBC History Documentary

Pictures of Pompeii

Weird Italy pompeii-road-photo 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Pompeii – between 1890 and 1905. Hand colored

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Road Street of Abundance, postcard ca. 1920-1923

Weird Italy StreetoftheTombs 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Street of the Tombs ca. 1900. Hand colored

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Pompeii and Herculaneum were two ancient Roman cities in Campania, at the bottom of the Mount Vesuvius. Ca
1890 and 1905. Hand colored

Weird Italy pompeii-scavi 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Excavation of the Temple of Isis at Pompeii, Gouache by Pietro Fabris (Italian Painter, active c. 1740-1792) in the book William Hamilton, Campi Phlegraei, Abb. XXXI.

Weird Italy Pompeii-Federer 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Pompeii from south-west; made by Friedrich Federer in 1850.

Pompeii population was approximately 20,000. The city was located in an area in which Romans had their holidays villas. The first evidence for the destruction was a letter written by Pliny the Younger who saw the eruption from a distance. He described the death of his uncle Pliny the Elder who died trying to rescue citizens.

Weird Italy Last-Days-pompeii 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Last Days of Pompeii, 1830-1833. Oil on canvas. 456.5 x 651 cm. The State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia

Victims

Weird Italy plaster-cast 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Weird Italy plaster-cast-2 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Weird Italy plaster-cast-3 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

The people and buildings of Pompeii were covered in up to twelve different layers of tephra, in total 25 meters deep, which rained down for about 6 hours.

The objects that lay beneath the city have been well preserved for centuries because of the lack of air and moisture. Pompeii had a complex water system, an amphitheatre, gymnasium and a port. Baths, brothels, swimming pools, aqueduct many houses, forum, markets, restaurants, shops, hotels and some out-of-town villas like the Villa of the Mysteries remain well preserved.

Weird Italy Villa-of-Ara-Massima 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Villa of Ara Massima

Weird Italy Roman-fresco-Villa-dei-Misteri-Pompeii 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Roman fresco, Villa of Mysterii

Weird Italy Wallpainting-at-the-villa-di-mysterii 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Wallpainting at the Villa of Mysterii

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Terentius Neo with wife. Terentius was a baker of humble origins who climbed the social ladder

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Boscotrecase, Agrippa Postumo Villa. Sacral-Idyllic Landscape.

Details of everyday life are preserved as well. The numerous graffiti carved on the walls and inside rooms provides a wealth of information regarding Roman lifestyle.

Weird Italy Vettii 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Peristyle of the House of the Vettii immediately after restoration (ca. 1900). Between 1890 and 1905

Weird Italy pompeii-life-style 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

House of Fight

Weird Italy house-of-punished-love 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

House of Punished Love

Weird Italy bakery 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Remains of a bakery

Weird Italy Castellum-Aquae-Pompeii- 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Castellum Aquae Pompeii

Some aspects of the culture were distinctly erotic, including frequent use of the phallus as apotropaion or good-luck charm in various types of decoration.

Weird Italy pompeii-erotica 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

LENTE IMPELLE means “Please, push slowly”

Weird Italy pompeii-erotica-2 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

A character with the beard and giant erect phallus of Priapus

Weird Italy pompeii-erotica-3 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Pompeian wall painting, from one of the Therms (baths)

Weird Italy pompei-3 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Weird Italy pompei-6 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Weird Italy pompei-11 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Weird Italy pompei-2 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Weird Italy pompei-10 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Weird Italy pompei-5 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

Weird Italy pompei-7 30 Amazing pictures of Pompeii Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  romans Pompeii Pliny the Younger Pliny the Elder Mount Vesuvius Imperial Rome Herculaneum graffiti erotic graffiti campania 79 AD

[Source: Wikipedia 1 , 2 Photo: Commons.WikiMedia]

Cities built by the Romans (The big list)

The list of cities built by the Romans over the centuries is impressive.

Some of the following cities may have been founded by other people, but have gained importance only with the Romans. The list is incomplete and it will be updated. If you find some mistake or if you have any suggestion, please comment below.Weird Italy lazio Cities built by the Romans (The big list) Italian History Magazine  rome romans roman empire roman cities paris london list history cities built by the romans

Thanks to /r/History for the help!

Cities founded by the Romans

Italy

Aosta (Augusta Praetoria)
Aquileia (destroyed by Huns)
Belluno (Belum)
Bologna (Bononia)
Caserta (Calatia)
Cremona (Cremona)
Ferrara (castrum bizantino was a Roman camp; Ferrara appears first in a document of the Lombard king Desiderius of 753 AD.)
Forlì (Forum Livii)
Iglesias (Ecclesia)
Lecce (Lupiae)
Macerata (Maceria or Macera)
Massa (Massa)
Monza (Modica)
Oristano (Aristius )
Pavia (Ticinum)
Piacenza (Placentia)
Pistoia (Pistorium, Pistoria or Piastoriae)
Pordenone (Portus Naonis)
Potenza (Potentia)
Ragusa (Rogos)
Reggio Emilia (Regium Lepidi)
Rimini (Ariminum)
Rome (obvious)
Salerno (Salernum)
Torino (Augusta Taurinorum)
Vicenza (Vicetia, Vincentia or Vicentia)
Concordia Sagittaria (Iulia Concordia – thanks to Ramon_Cogoleto)
Oderzo (Opitergium – thanks to Ramon_Cogoleto)
Algeria

Cherchell (Cesarea)

Austria

Schwechat (Ala Nova)
Fischamend (Aequinoctium)
Leibnitz (Flavia Solva)
Lienz (Aguntum)
Vienna (Vindobona)
Wels (Ovilava – thanks to justutis)
Enns (Lauriacum – thanks to justutis)
Zollfeld (Virunum – thanks to justutis)
Salzburg (Iuvavum – thanks to forgetaboutmary)
Zirl in Tirol (Teriolis)
Linz (Lentia)
Wallsee-Sindelburg bei Amstetten (Ad Iuvense)
Pöchlarn  (Arelape)
Traismauer (Augustianis)
Zwentendorf an der Donau (Asturis)
Tulln an der Donau (Comagena)
Zeiselmauer-Wolfpassing (Cannabiaca)

Belgium

Tongeren (Atuatuca Tungrorum, thanks to Yavanaril)

Croatia

Osijek (Mursa – thanks to djaponja)
Sisak (Siscia- thanks to djaponja)
Rijeka,Trsat (Tarsatica- thanks to djaponja)
Ploče (Pretoria- thanks to djaponja)
Metković (Narona- thanks to djaponja)
Omišalj (Fulfinum – Mirine- thanks to djaponja)
Karin (Corinium- thanks to djaponja)
Kistanje (Burnum- thanks to djaponja)
Šćitarjevo (Andautonia- thanks to djaponja)
Čitluk (Aequum- thanks to djaponja)
Crikvenica (Ad turres- thanks to djaponja)

France

Lyon (Colonia Copia Claudia Augusta Lugdunum)
Paris (Lutetia Parisiorum)
Metz (Divodurum)
Beauvais (Caesaromagus)
Châlons-en-Champagne (Catalauni)
Amiens (Samarobriva)
Besançon (Vesontio)
Germany

Augsburg (Augusta Vindelicorum)
Bonn (Bonna)
Cologne / Köln (Colonia Agrippina)
Ellingen (Castellum Sablonetum – thanks to UnmercatorGreenland)
Frankfurt am Main (The city district Bonames has a name probably dating back to Roman times—it is thought to be derived from bona me(n)sa – thank to cpsartory)
Mainz (Mogontiacum)
Neuss (Novaesium)
Theilenhofen (Iciniacum – thanks to UnmercatorGreenland)
Trier (Augusta Treverorum)
Weißenburg (Biriciana – thanks to UnmercatorGreenland)
Xanten (Castra Vetera)
Walting (Vetoniana)
Kösching (Castelum Germanicum)
Pförring (Celeusum)
Eining (Abusina)
Stadt Straubing in Niederbayern (Sorviodurum)
Künzing in Niederbayern (Quintanis)
Kellmünz in Schwaben (Caelius Mons)
Kempten im Allgäu (Cambodunum)
Isny im Allgäu (Vemania)
Schlögen (Ioviacum)
Mautern an der Donau (Favianis)

England

Chester (Deva Victrix)
Chester-le-Street (Concangis)
Cirencester (Corinium Dobunnorum)
Gloucester (Colonia Nervia Glevensium)
Exeter (Isca Dumnoniorum)
Lancaster
Leicester (Ratae Corieltauvorum – thanks to markw1988)
Lincoln (Colonia Domitiana Lindensium)
London (Londinium)
Loughor (Leucarum)
Manchester (Mancunium, Mamucium)
Mancetter (Manduessedum)
Usk (Burrium)
York (Ebocarum, thanks to PhysTom and Furthur_slimeking)
Newcastle upon Tyne (Pons Aelius – thanks to abandoned_trolley)
Corbridge (Coria – thanks to abandoned_trolley)
South Shields (Arbeia – thanks to abandoned_trolley)
Wallsend (Segedunum – thanks to abandoned_trolley)

Hungary

Komárom (Colonia Claudia Savaria)
Sopron, Ödenburg (Scarabantia)
Mosonmagyaróvár (Ad Flexum)
Győr (Arrabona)
Visegrád (Quadriburgium)
Budapest (Aquincum)
Sz?ny (Brigetio)

Israel

Caesarea (thanks to jstein97)

Netherlands

Voorburg (Forum Hadriani – thanks to LaoBa)
Nijmegen (Ulpia Noviomagus – thanks to LaoBa)

Romania

Alba Iulia (Apulum)

Serbia

Nis (Naissus – thanks to kolibri29)
Sremska Mitrovica (Sirmium – thanks to kolibri29)
Kostolac (Viminacium – thanks to kolibri29)

Slovenia

Ptuj (Poetovio)
Ljubljana (Emona)
Celje (Celeia)
Birnbaumer Wald (Ad Pirum)
Ajdovščina (Castra)

Syria

Buseira (Circesium)

Spain

Astorga (Asturica or Asturica Augusta)
Zaragoza (Cesaraugusta)
Cordoba (Corduba)
Mérida (Augusta Emerita)
León (Legio)
Seville (Hispalis)
Tarragona (Tarraco)
Huesca (Osca, Calagurris)
Valencia (Valentia)
A Coruña (Brigantium – thanks to Highlord)
Lugo (Lucus Augusta – thanks to Highlord)
Palencia (Palantia – thanks to Highlord)
Avila (Ovil – thanks to Highlorda)
Girona (Ullastret – thanks to Highlord)
Ampurias (Emporiae – thanks to Highlord)
Tarragona (Tarraco – thanks to Highlord)
Sagunto (Saguntum – thanks to Highlord)
Murcia (Cigarralejo – thanks to Highlord)
Baza (Baza – thanks to Highlord)
Santinponce (Italica – thanks to Highlord)
Mérida (Emerita Augusta – thanks to Highlord)
Lérida (Toletum – thanks to Highlord)
Albacete (Castellar – thanks to Highlord)
Écija (Astigi – thanks to Highlord)
Astorga (Asturica – thanks to Highlord)
Santander (Portus Victoriae Iuliobrigensium – thanks to Highlord)

Switzerland

Saint-Maurice (Agaunum)
Avenches (Aventicum)
Bern
Lausanne (Lousonna)
Martigny
Nyon (Noviodunum , Colonia Iulia Equestris)
Orbe (Urba)
Yverdon-les-Bains (District. Eburodunum , Ebredunum)
Windisch AG (Vindonissa)
Augst and Kaiseraugst (Augusta Raurica – thanks to caoimhin22)
Winterthur (Vitudurum – thanks to abart)
Zurich (Turicum – thanks to abart)
Arbon in der Schweiz (Arbor Felix)

Portugal

Coimbra (Municipium Aeminium – thanks to PunchingClouzot)
Póvoa de Varzim (Villa Euracini)

Tunisia

Haïdra (Ammaedara)

Wales

Caerleon (Isa Augusta – thanks to Schmillt)

Cities not founded by the Romans but have gained importance with the Romans

Italy

Altino (Altinum – thanks to Ramon_Cogoleto)
Ascoli (Asculum)
Avellino (Abellinum)
Bari (Barium)

Brescia (Brixia)
Milano (Mediolanum)
Padova (Patavium)
Pompei
Capua
Como (Comum)
Bolzano (Bauzanum)
Cuneo (Cuneus)
Firenze (Florentia)
Ravenna
Verona
Reggio Calabria (Regium Iulium)
Rieti (Reate)
Viterbo (Castrum Herculis)
Civitavecchia (Centumcellae)
Terni (Interamna Nahars)
Lodi (Laus Pompeia)
Mondragone (Sinuessa, Petrinum – thanks to porcellus_ultor)

Algeria

Tébessa (Theveste)

Austria

Bregenz (Brigantia, Brigantium)

Bulgaria

Vidin (Bononia)

Croatia

Senj (Senia- thanks to djaponja)
Split (Salona – thanks to Sp3ctr3)

England

Bath (Aquae Sulis) – thanks to BigRedS
Canterbury (Durovernum Cantiacorum) – thanks to Furthur_slimeking
Colchester (Camulodunum)
St Albans (Verulamium) – thanks to BigRedS
Salisbury (Old Sarum, Sorviodunum – thanks to oh_him )

France

Boulogne-sur-Mer (Bononia)
Harfleur (Caracotinum)
Nimes (Nemausus)
Strasbourg (Argentoratum o Argentorate)
Reims (Durocortorum, thanks to njm1314)

Germany

Passau (Castra Batava, Batavis, before known as Boiodurum)
Regensburg (Castra Regina)

Libya

Lebda (Leptis Magna – thanks to porcellus_ultor)

Macedonia

Skopje (Scupi)

Netherlands

Alphen aan den Rijn (Castellum Albanianae)
Katwijk (Lugdunum Batavorum)
Leiden (Matilo)
Nijmegen (Oppidum Batavorum)
Maastricht (Trajectum ad Mosam)
Utrecht (Trajectum ad Renum)
Valkenburg (Praetorium Agrippinae)
Velsen (Flevum o Phleum)

Serbia

Belgrade (Singidunum)

Syria

Bosra (Nova Trajana Bostra)

Spain

Alicante (Lucentum)
Almuñecar (Firmium Julium Sexi – thanks to Highlord)
Barcelona (Barkeno, Barcino, Colonia Iulia Augusta Faventia Paterna Barcino)
Lugo (Lucus Augusti)
Cartagena (Carthago Nova – thanks to El_Kyle)
Granada (Elvira – thanks to Highlord)
Malaga (Malaca – thanks to Highlord)
Cádiz (Gades – thanks to Highlord)
Huelva (Onuba – thanks to Highlord)
Salamanca (Salmantica – thanks to Highlord)
Segovia (thanks to Highlord)

Switzerland

Sion (Sedunum)
Chur (Curia Raetorum)

Portugal

Évora (Ebora Cerealis – thanks to porcellus_ultor)
Lisbon (Olisipo – thanks to porcellus_ultor)
Braga (Bracara Augusta – thanks to PunchingClouzot)
Bragança (Brigantia)
Leiria (Collipo)
Elvas (Dipo)
Alvor (Ipses)
Lamego (Lamecum)
Loriga (Lorica)
Santiago do Cacém (Mirobriga Celticorum)
Porto (Portus Cale)
Portimão (Portus Hannibalis)
Covilhã (Tritum)

Turkey

Istanbul (Nova Roma ; Byzantium)
Zeugma, Commagene (Zeugma)

Cities with Roman legendary origins

China

Liquian (the legendary lost roman legion built this town fleeing from Persia)

Source

Psitrend , Wikipedia , Reddit

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