Category Archives: What to see in Italy

Best Places and Destinations to Visit in Italy.

A Guide To The Best Surf Spots In Italy

For those of us with a love for all things surf, finding the right surfing destination around the world to suit your style and preference can be difficult.

However, in Italy, you are spoilt for choice when it comes to amazing surfing locations that offer something unique for every skill set and taste. So, while you get ready to grab the wetsuits and get on the next flight, we are going to show you a list of some of the best surf spots in Italy.

Tuscany

When looking for surf in Italy, regardless of the level of surfing experience that you have, you have to visit Maremma in Tuscany. This picturesque coastline not only has one of the best weather systems for surfing, but its sheer length means that you can pick a beach that suits your every taste and get down to surfing without a heaving crowd. For beginners, this offers you enough room to find your feet, while experienced surfers can enjoy the tranquillity of the warm waters.

Lido Di Ostia, Rome

Home to multiple surf schools dotted across the entire expanse, this spot of Coastline is the ideal place for beginners to catch some waves and spend some well-needed rest and relaxation at a beach just a stone’s throw from Italy’s great capital. Located just outside of Rome, this beach is a favourite for those living within the city and for those visiting, allowing them to enjoy the surf and the amazing weather away from the hustle and bustle of the busy city centre. However, while the surf is certainly worthy of a visit, the water can be dirty and the beaches often become quite crowded during the summer months. Therefore it may be beneficial for you to venture to the public beaches either early in the morning or later into the evening, or simply avoid the height of the season if you are looking for a relaxing surf.

Sicily

Sicily is the ideal destination for those that want to surf amazing beaches and truly unique wave breaks and with plenty to do beyond the beach too, this stunning destination offers the perfect opportunity for a full holiday escape. With key spots such as Agrigento offering breathtaking waves with very few visitors to contend with, you’ll have the experience that you want all to yourself without any hassle. Whether you decide to surf on a longer board or a shorter board you can be sure that the beaches here have it all, with waves offering you a truly exhilarating experience.

Veneto

Veneto is arguably one of the best surfing locations in Italy, with the golden coastline of beaches offering plenty of warm and wonderful waves for everyone regardless of the difficulty level that you are currently comfortable at. However, as with the best of the surf spots in Italy, the experience is completely dependent on the weather conditions. After all, the windier it is, the bigger the swells are. These locations rely very heavily on the weather and this can have a profound effect on the surf that you will find when you visit.

If you’re looking for surfing in Italy, you are certainly spoilt for choice. With some of the most amazing landscapes around and amazing weather conditions to match, you can have hours of fun out on the waves throughout the duration of your trip. Where will you surf first?

Image: pixabay

Three fascinating cultural practices from ancient Rome

Italy is stuffed with culture like some kind of metaphysical, literally culture-stuffed calzone.

Obviously, all countries have something to show for themselves, but the fact is Italy is culturally rich in all those aspects that phrases like cultural richness connote.

Italian drama, paintings and desserts are known worldwide for their pedigree. Italian food is eaten with (sometimes literal) relish all over the world – served from street vans and in Michelin-star restaurants. There is a robustness to Italy’s cultural capital that is the mark of a true centre of refinement.

And the reason for all this, of course, is the legacy of the Roman Empire. Like the British or Ottoman Empire, the empire of Rome encompassed such a vast swath of the globe (over two million square miles, to be precise) that its seat of power could not help but become the treasure trove of its particular epoch. As new cultures were conquered and assimilated, all flowed back to the capital. Not just materially, either. Empires are renowned for being melting pots of art and culture. And Rome was no different.

In this article, we take a look at look at three fascinating aspects of Roman culture throughout history, and what they tell us about the empire.

The separate treatment of the head and body in Roman sculpture (stone)

Weird Italy cultural-practices-from-ancient-Rome-2 Three fascinating cultural practices from ancient Rome Italian History What to see in Italy  Imperial Rome
IMAGE SOURCE: Pixabay

The difference in attitude from head to body is fascinating. While the heads of many Roman sculptures are finely cast, with much attention paid to idiosyncratic liniments and the reality of age, the bodies tell a different story.

In the Greek tradition, the bodies of most Roman sculptures represent an ideal rather than an individual. They are quite literally carved from stone, to borrow a pun from the world of bodybuilding. The reasons for this duality are not abundantly clear but are thought to be traceable back to a few key facts.

For one, the heads of Roman statues were forever being removed and replaced by other heads. When you consider this, the need for a generic, one-size-fits-all body becomes apparent, as does the reasoning behind making the prolific body easy on the eye – why would you not?

As to why the lust for decapitation, the answer is actually quite pragmatic. Great Romans fell out of favour at a tabloid rate, but unlike today, their representation in media was permanent. Hence, rather than making a new statue, swapping out the head was a lot faster.

Lucky bronze

Since ancient times, coins have been associated with luck. But the practice originated in Rome. The emperor Vespasian would hand out ‘touch pieces’ to the sick on walks throughout the great city.

As was the case in many ancient societies, the ruler was supposed to have some sacred connection with the god or gods that presided over the society’s affairs. The Holy Roman Emperor was no different. In fact, some members of the imperial family actually were deified – transcending flesh and bone to become part of the indelible cosmos. It’s alright for some.

The coins then were imbued with a considerable spark of that divinity – or at least enough to give advanced leprosy a run for its money. The tradition of touching divine metals is preserved in Italy to this day in the form of the Il Porcellino. According to betway casino online list of lucky customs, here the luck is said to be had in touching the nose, which has caused it to be finely polished. This tradition has made its way all the way from 1766, so it’s having a good run. If the superstitious nature of people has not changed, at least we’re now more enamoured with magically contagious craftsmanship/graft than unearned privilege.

The vomitorium

Of course, no list about the oddities of ancient Rome would be complete without a mention of the vomitorium – so we’ll go one better and debunk this bilious falsehood. The term vomitorium was indeed used to describe certain facets of architecture in Roman times, but its use was metaphorical, according to The Conversation.

Vomitorium meant something close to “the place where people spew out” – meaning the place they gather to and dessert in large number, rapidly. Trans-located to modern parlance, the term might be aptly used to describe a football stadium or cinema. Unfortunately, our imaginations are far more taken with stories of excess and decadent rulers.

These artefacts of a lost time are sure to titillate the culture vultures among you, but for those less conventional there are many Italian destinations somewhat off the beaten track.

5 Spots To Go Off The Beaten Path In Italy

Italy, for many is the dream holiday destination. Whether it’s exploring the ancient history of Rome or becoming immersed in the romance of Venice, there is something for everyone no matter your travel plans.

However, when looking to travel to Italy, it is important to ensure you have an ehic card. This will help you with medical care should the need arise, giving you peace of mind to explore Italy and continue finding the hidden gems the country has to offer worry-free. Here, we’re taking a closer look at 5 spots off the beaten track to explore whilst in Italy.

Civita di Bagnoregio

This unbelievable town is a must-see site when looking for amazing places to visit off of the beaten track in Italy. This small town also referred to as the dying town by locals, can only be accessed by foot bridge and is slowly beginning to fall away as erosion continues to occur. This town is well worth a visit for those looking for history and amazing landscapes, and this hidden gem on the mountain is an amazing location to visit to escape the busy tourist spots within Italy.

Lake Resia

Lake Resia is one of Italy’s most secretive locations. This weird yet wonderful lake was once the town of Graun before it was flooded more than 60 years ago. The last remaining piece of Graun that remains above this vast expanse of water is the clock tower that emerges from the lake, making this a popular attraction for those seeking to explore the most unique places Italy has to offer. With a hiking trail surrounding this lake it is widely accessible for all how wish to visit and when frozen you can walk out to the clock tower to have a closer look. This location really has to been seen to be believed and is well worth a visit for those looking to be away from the hustle and bustle of the tourism spots throughout Italy.

The Garden Of Ninfa

Weird Italy ninfa-castle 5 Spots To Go Off The Beaten Path In Italy What to see in Italy    This garden located in the Pontine Marshes is built within the ruins of the old Italian town of Ninfa and is one of Italy’s hidden treasures. Unknown to most locals, this picturesque location really is a must see when looking to venture off the beaten track. Spanning over eight acres of land with over 1300 different types of plant, it is no surprise that this hidden garden has been declared one of the most romantic locations in the world. The old ruins located within this luscious landscape make it an amazing location for buddying photographers or traveller’s looking for hidden gems within the Italian country side.

Bomarzo

Also referred to as the park of monsters, this unique location within the forest is home to several 16th century statues of monsters which venture into the world of mythology as well as small buildings located within this vast forest area. With many of these statues alluding to somewhat of a supernatural nature it is no surprise that this is a popular tourist attraction for those looking for something a little out of the ordinary when visiting Italy.

The Castelli Romani

This small group of villages just outside of Rome plays host to amazing houses which were originally built to house rich romans during the summer months, to escape the hustle and bustle of the busy capital. Now home to the summer house of the pope, this is a popular destination for those not only looking for history but potential spiritual enlightenment. During the summer months the pope often opens up his home for Sunday blessings for those wish to pay a visit, making this location an ideal destination off of the beaten track as it offers something for everyone. With amazing architecture and picturesque landscapes it is no surprise that this is a popular destination for those looking to briefly escape the busy capital.

Each of the places located within Italy are ideal if you are looking to explore a different side to Italy, with something for everyone no matter who you are travelling with it is now easier than ever to have a holiday of a life time exploring the hidden gems that Italy has to offer. Safe travels!

5 Lesser-Known Museums in Italy Worth Visiting

It’s no secret that some of Western civilization’s greatest treasures are housed within the world-famous cultural mausoleums that litter the Italian peninsula.

From the bustling Uffizi Gallery in Florence to the majestic Borghese in Rome and the imposing Sforza Castle in Milan, Italy’s greatest museums are flocked to by tourists and locals alike all year round.

However, while you can’t blame a traveller for wanting to catch a crowded glimpse of Michaelangelo’s David as part of their Italian Bucket List, it’s important not to lose sight of some of the equally unmissable yet off-the-radar cultural highlights. Across Italy’s biggest cities and smallest towns, you’ll find plenty of lesser-known and often smaller museums which happen to house some of the most important artefacts in Western History. If you want to beat the crowds and soak up some of the best of Italian culture and history, read this round-up of the best lesser-known museums in the country.

Keats-Shelley House, Rome

Tucked away in a corner right next to the bustling Spanish Steps, Keats-Shelley House is a touching homage to the life and death of some of Britain’s great poets and authors. Although the original Victorian decor within feels like a little slice of Britishness right in the heart of Rome, this intimate museum tells the story of a fascinating period of Italian history. The early 19th Century was a time when the city was in vogue with the jet-set crowd, and Byron, Wordsworth, Oscar Wilde and Mary Shelley (author of Frankenstein) are all connected to this little flat in Rome. Check out the huge collection of original writings and memorabilia, as well as the bed where Shelley died of tuberculosis.

Museo Dell’Opera del Duomo, Florence


Few can deny that the imposing Duomo building which dominates the Florentine skyline is one of Italy’s most breathtaking and unmissable highlights. However, this little-known museum just to the east of the mighty Duomo houses many of the iconic artworks that were originally commissioned for display in the Cathedral. Among stunning and iconic religious works such as Ghiberti’s Gates of Paradise, you’ll find an awe-inspiring pieta by Michaelangelo himself, originally designed for his own tomb! The museum is a great place to shake off the hordes of tourists which flood the centre of Florence in the summer, and an ideal way to spend an afternoon exploring seven centuries of quintessentially Florentine artwork.

The Money Museum, Rome

Weird Italy The-Money-Museum-Rome 5 Lesser-Known Museums in Italy Worth Visiting What to see in Italy
Source: Pixabay

Opened by the Bank of Italy back in 1993, the Money Museum is an engaging and informative journey through the history of money in a country that arguably invented and popularised the use of currency. This intimate and beautifully built museum houses 5000 years of history, showcasing coin collections from ancient Rome, all the way up to the Euro, in a touching and thought-provoking narrative. The museum also tells the story of Italy’s transition from the Lira to the Euro, and how this has affected current trading conditions today. The country adopted the Euro shortly after joining the EU in 1999, becoming one of the first countries to do so. The exhibitions tell a fluent and fascinating story that will definitely teach you a lot about an often neglected subject.

Villa Necchi Campiglio, Milan

Weird Italy Villa-Necchi-Campiglio 5 Lesser-Known Museums in Italy Worth Visiting What to see in Italy
Source: Villa Necchi Campiglio via Facebook

Bringing it forward right into the 20th Century for this one, the Villa Necchi Campiglio was built by a wealthy industrialist family at the height of their wealth in 1930s Milan. This place definitely makes a difference from the ornate Rococo and Renaissance architecture so synonymous with Italy, given the smooth, minimalist design that was all the rage during the Mussolini years. The severe building was home to the city’s first heated swimming pool, and has since starred in films, fashion shows, and housed all of Europe’s leading royal houses. All well as a roving display of contemporary art exhibitions, the house, tucked away in a quiet corner of the bustling Milanese city centre, also showcases beautifully designed pieces of Italian futurist and Bauhaus furnishings, art and everyday appliances. The grounds are also a uniquely serene experience.

Museo Della Zisa, Palermo

Weird Italy Museo-Della-Zisa 5 Lesser-Known Museums in Italy Worth Visiting What to see in Italy
Source: Pixabay

Swinging by Sicily for this last one, this 12th Century castle, also known simply as the Zisa, is a UNESCO World Heritage site and a dramatic monument to a violent, chaotic and vital moment in Italian history. The name of the castle derives from the Arab world for “splendid” and was envisioned by the Norman King William I of Sicily as a magnificent summer residence for his family. The castle is one of the few remaining Moorish designs in the region, with the Arabic inscriptions gracefully carved across the exterior, as well as extensive Islamic mosaic and tile collections helping to paint a vivid picture of the Arab history of Sicily. An unforgettable building with luscious gardens, you can easily spend an entire day here soaking up the dramatic history and lounging by the water features.

If you know of any lesser-known museums which you think deserve more recognition, let us know in the comments!

The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d’Este

The Villa d’Este in Tivoli is a masterpiece of the Italian Renaissance and is listed on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

The villa was commissioned by Cardinal Ippolito d’Este, son of Alfonso I and Lucrezia Borgia (Ferrara 1509 – Rome 1572), on a site of a Roman villa.

The history of its construction is linked to the events of its first owner. Pope Julius III thanked the Cardinal d’Este for the essential contribution made in 1550 to his election to the papal throne by appointing him governor for life of Tivoli and its territory. The cardinal arrived in Tivoli on 9 September and made a triumphal entry, but discovered that he would have to live in an old and uncomfortable convent attached to the church of Santa Maria Maggiore, built centuries earlier by the Benedictines, now held by the Franciscans and partially readjusted to governor’s residence.

Hippolytus decided to turn the convent into a villa. This would have been the twin of the grand palace that he was building at the same time in Rome, in Monte Giordano; while the Roman palace was intended to serve the “official” receptions in Rome, the villa of Tivoli should have been a pleasant place for meetings.

Weird Italy tivoli-waterfall The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
Great Cascade, Tivoli, Lazio, Italy, between 1890 and 1905.

It is no coincidence that the place where the villa was built had the name “Valle Gaudente”.

Weird Italy hall-of-Glory The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
Noble apartment, hall of Glory

The works were entrusted to the architect Pirro Ligorio, flanked by an impressive number of artists and artisans.

Weird Italy The-Godess-Nature-Fountain The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
The Godess Nature Fountain in the garden of Villa d’Este in Tivol, Italy

The Cardinal barely had time to enjoy the solemn inauguration of the villa, which took place in September 1572 with the visit of Pope Gregory XIII; in fact, he died on December 2nd of the same year.

Weird Italy tivoli-villa-d-este The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
Villa d’Este, Tivoli, Lazio, Italy. View of town. Johnston, Frances Benjamin, 1864-1952, photographer. Glass lantern slide, hand-colored.

The first owners were three cardinals of Este governors of Tivoli: the patron Hippolytus II, the nephew Luigi until 1586 and finally Alexander, until 1624.

Weird Italy One.hundred.fountain.at_.villa_.deste_ The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
The One Hundred Fountain (Le Centro Fontane) at the Villa d’Este

In 1918, after the First World War, the villa passed to the Italian State that began important restoration work and opening it to the public. Another series of restorations was then performed after World War II to repair the damage caused by bombings during the last world war.

Tivoli italy gardens images

Weird Italy tivoli-villa-d-este-2 The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
Villa d’Este, Tivoli, Lazio, Italy. Shaded walk. 1925 summer. Johnston, Frances Benjamin, 1864-1952, photographer. House Architecture: Pirro Ligorio, 1560-1575. Landscape: Pirro Ligorio and Cardinal Ippolito II d’Este.
Weird Italy Fresco-of-hall-of-Apollo-in-Villa-dEste-Tivoli The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
Fresco of hall of Apollo in Villa d’Este (Tivoli)
Weird Italy Villa-dEste-Tivoli-Lazio-Italy-8 The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
View to Sabine Mountains from villa. Villa d’Este, Tivoli, Lazio, Italy. Johnston, Frances Benjamin, 1864-1952, photographer.
Weird Italy Tivoli-Villa-Este-second-cave-grotto The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
Tivoli, Villa d’Este: second cave grotto between Organ Fountain and Fountain of Neptune (one of the so-called “caves of the Sibyls”)
Weird Italy noble-apartment The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
Noble apartment, room of the Hunt
Weird Italy the-hall-of-Nobility The Gardens of Tivoli in Italy: Villa d'Este Italian History What to see in Italy  UNESCO Tivoli Renaissance Lucrezia Borgia Lazio Ippolito d'Este
Tivoli, Villa d’Este: rooms on the main floor, the hall of Nobility

Image source: Wikimedia

The Historical Archive of Banco of Naples

“Archivio storico del Banco di Napoli” was founded in 1539. This archive is a valuable source of historical information ranging from 1450 to today.

The Banco di Napoli Historical Archive is the largest collection of existing bank records in the world. In 330 rooms are collected and cataloged bank documents ranging from the mid-1500s to today. It is located in the headquarters of the Fondazione Banco di Napoli, in via dei Tribunali.

Images: https://www.facebook.com/fondazionebancodinapoli Weird Italy archivio-storico-napoli-010 The Historical Archive of Banco of Naples Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  naples history naples campania Banco di Napoli Historical Archive Banco di Napoli Archivio storico del Banco di Napoli ancient library ancient books   Weird Italy archivio-storico-napoli-007 The Historical Archive of Banco of Naples Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  naples history naples campania Banco di Napoli Historical Archive Banco di Napoli Archivio storico del Banco di Napoli ancient library ancient books   Weird Italy archivio-storico-napoli-006 The Historical Archive of Banco of Naples Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  naples history naples campania Banco di Napoli Historical Archive Banco di Napoli Archivio storico del Banco di Napoli ancient library ancient books   Weird Italy archivio-storico-napoli-005 The Historical Archive of Banco of Naples Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  naples history naples campania Banco di Napoli Historical Archive Banco di Napoli Archivio storico del Banco di Napoli ancient library ancient books   Weird Italy archivio-storico-napoli-004 The Historical Archive of Banco of Naples Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  naples history naples campania Banco di Napoli Historical Archive Banco di Napoli Archivio storico del Banco di Napoli ancient library ancient books   Weird Italy archivio-storico-napoli-003 The Historical Archive of Banco of Naples Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  naples history naples campania Banco di Napoli Historical Archive Banco di Napoli Archivio storico del Banco di Napoli ancient library ancient books   Weird Italy archivio-storico-napoli-001 The Historical Archive of Banco of Naples Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  naples history naples campania Banco di Napoli Historical Archive Banco di Napoli Archivio storico del Banco di Napoli ancient library ancient books

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Underground Tunnels of Galleria Borbonica in Naples

The Galleria Borbonica, Tunnel Borbonico or Bourbon Tunnel is an ancient military underground passage connenting the Royal Palace to military barracks in Naples, enabling the king to flee to the sea and the soldiers to defend the palace quickly.

Errico Alvino was commissioned  to construct a military passage for troops. Two years after it was begun, the fall of the Bourbon dynasty led construction to halt. The underground halls and floors were originally tuff stone pits and also contained old water cisterns.

During the hundreds of bombings in World War II the people of Naples used the rooms as shelters. Being forgotten the tunnel system became a depot for illegal cars and bikes confiscated by the police in the 1920s/1930s.

The tunnel contains decades of debris, including vintage cars and a discarded fascist monument that had been made for Aurelio Padovani. Since 2014 the tunnels are open for touristic tours.

SOURCE: Wikipedia, Galleria Borbonica
IMAGES: Vittorio Sciosia

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Topic: Catacombs of Naples,Galleria Borbonica, Tunnel Borbonico,Naples,Bourbon Tunnel,underground tunnels,Campania

 

Ai Pioppi – Mechanical Amusement Park, Treviso

Bruno Ferrin, 79 years old from Nervesa della Battaglia, Treviso, built an amusement park consisting of 45 mechanical rides and attractions (including swings, merry-go-round, slides, roller coasters, trampolines) he designed and built; all the rides work without electricity.

The attractions are spread over 30,000 square meters of land. In 1969, when he decided to open an inn (Ai Pioppi) as second business. After few years he made his first swing. Then he planned more ambitious projects. Ferrin started building rides for his customers to enjoy. Fabrica produced an interesting documentary about his work.

Weird Italy Human-Powered-Amusement-Park Ai Pioppi - Mechanical Amusement Park, Treviso Italian People Magazine What to see in Italy  video veneto trip veneto treviso osteria ai pioppi nervesa della battaglia human-powered giant theme park playground Bruno Ferrin amusement rides

Official Website: Osteria Ai Pioppi

Ancient Pagan Temple of Diana, Nemi

This Roman sanctuary and the Sacred Wood are located on the northern shore of Lake Nemi, just few kilometres outside Rome.

The temple of Diana Nemorensis was preceded by the sacred grove.  Diana of the Wood or Diana Nemorensis was a Roman goddess. Later was hellenised and conflated with Artemis. The temple of Diana Aricina or Nemorense was a huge complex located in Nemi. It covers an area of 45,000 square meters, supported by triangular substructures and by semicircular niches with statues and an upper terrace.

Weird Italy Niches-of-Temple-of-Diana-in-Nemi Ancient Pagan Temple of Diana, Nemi Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  temple of diana roman history pagan temple nemi trip nemi travel nemi Lazio Diana Nemorensis
Niches of Temple of Diana in Nemi. Author: Livioandronico2013

The platform is composed by two Doric porticoes, one with columns plastered in red, the other with columns of dark gray lava stone; there were statues, rooms for priests, accommodation for pilgrims, cells, a temple, baths and even a theater.

Weird Italy Walls-of-Temple-of-Diana-in-Nemi Ancient Pagan Temple of Diana, Nemi Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  temple of diana roman history pagan temple nemi trip nemi travel nemi Lazio Diana Nemorensis
Walls of Temple of Diana in Nemi. Author: Livioandronico2013

Today, a part of a portico, one votive altar and some columns are still visible. The rest of temple, that spreads over an area of over 5000 square meters, is still waiting to be excavated. The higher parts, such as niches, that emerge from the ground for several meters show the  size of the original temple.

Weird Italy Rests-of-altar-and-temple-of-Temple-of-Diana-in-Nemi Ancient Pagan Temple of Diana, Nemi Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  temple of diana roman history pagan temple nemi trip nemi travel nemi Lazio Diana Nemorensis
Rests of altar and temple of Temple of Diana in Nemi. Author: Livioandronico2013

The temple was abandoned with the advent of Christianity and partly robbed of marbles and decorations; the forest gradually covered it almost completely and it was forgotten for centuries.

Weird Italy Rests-of-Temple-of-Diana-in-Nemi Ancient Pagan Temple of Diana, Nemi Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  temple of diana roman history pagan temple nemi trip nemi travel nemi Lazio Diana Nemorensis
Rests of Temple of Diana in Nemi. Author: Livioandronico2013

Archaeological excavations began in the seventeenth century by mostly amateurs and foreign scholars, and for this reason statues and relics are scattered in many different museums.

Weird Italy Diana Ancient Pagan Temple of Diana, Nemi Italian History Magazine What to see in Italy  temple of diana roman history pagan temple nemi trip nemi travel nemi Lazio Diana Nemorensis
Diana of the Wood or Diana Nemorensis was a Roman goddess. Later was hellenised and conflated with Artemis.

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