Category Archives: Italian People

Stories and Biographies of Amazing People from Italy.

The amazing Movie Posters of Silvano Campeggi

On 29 August died Silvano Campeggi (also known by the nickname “Nano”), painter and poster maker known for having made Hollywood movie posters like Casablanca, Gone with the Wind, Singing in the Rain, An American in Paris, West Side Story, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Judgment at Nuremberg, Exodus and Breakfast at Tiffany.

Campeggi was 95 years old and died in San Felice a Ema, Florence, where he returned to live after spending many years in the United States.

Weird Italy silvano-campeggi The amazing Movie Posters of Silvano Campeggi Cinema Italian Art, Design & Photography Italian People  movie posters design   Campeggi was born in Florence in 1923: he was the son of a typesetter
and a printer, he became interested in graphic design and studied at the Porta Romana Art Institute. After his studies, he collaborated and studied with Florentine artists such as Ottone Rosai and Ardengo Soffici and during the Second World War, he worked for the American Red Cross, making portraits of the soldiers before they returned home. After the war, he went to live in Rome and made the first posters: the first was the one for the film Black Eagle, 1946.

A few years ago, interviewed by the Italian newspaper Il Giornale, he said: “In the golden days of cinema I have come to make more than 150 [posters] a year, practically one every two days. Metro never printed less than 12,000 copies. But for the blockbusters, they made more than 25,000 copies”. To the journalist who asked him how much he earned, he said, “I do not remember. I really mean it. It’s been more than 40 years. I only know that Ben-Hur or Tom & Jerry were paid equally “.

Campeggi designed the poster and advertising graphics for over 3000 films, working not only under contract with the MGM studios, but also with Warner Brothers, United Artists, RKO, Twentieth-Century Fox, Paramount, Universal, Columbia Pictures, and several others. Sixty-four of the films he illustrated won Oscars, including Casablanca, Ben-Hur, Singin’ in the Rain, An American in Paris, West Side Story, Exodus, and Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

Weird Italy west-side-story The amazing Movie Posters of Silvano Campeggi Cinema Italian Art, Design & Photography Italian People  movie posters design   Weird Italy exodus The amazing Movie Posters of Silvano Campeggi Cinema Italian Art, Design & Photography Italian People  movie posters design   Weird Italy cat-on-a-hot-tin-roof The amazing Movie Posters of Silvano Campeggi Cinema Italian Art, Design & Photography Italian People  movie posters design   Weird Italy breakfast-at-tiffany The amazing Movie Posters of Silvano Campeggi Cinema Italian Art, Design & Photography Italian People  movie posters design   Weird Italy an-american-in-paris The amazing Movie Posters of Silvano Campeggi Cinema Italian Art, Design & Photography Italian People  movie posters design

Source: Il Post

Ai Pioppi – Mechanical Amusement Park, Treviso

Bruno Ferrin, 79 years old from Nervesa della Battaglia, Treviso, built an amusement park consisting of 45 mechanical rides and attractions (including swings, merry-go-round, slides, roller coasters, trampolines) he designed and built; all the rides work without electricity.

The attractions are spread over 30,000 square meters of land. In 1969, when he decided to open an inn (Ai Pioppi) as second business. After few years he made his first swing. Then he planned more ambitious projects. Ferrin started building rides for his customers to enjoy. Fabrica produced an interesting documentary about his work.

Weird Italy Human-Powered-Amusement-Park Ai Pioppi - Mechanical Amusement Park, Treviso Italian People Magazine What to see in Italy  video veneto trip veneto treviso osteria ai pioppi nervesa della battaglia human-powered giant theme park playground Bruno Ferrin amusement rides

Official Website: Osteria Ai Pioppi

Giovanni Leonardo Di Bona, the first International Master champion in the History of Chess

Giovanni Leonardo, known as Il Puttino (Small Child), was born in Cutro, Calabria. Giovanni Leonardo di Bona won the first known international master tournament in the history of chess becoming the strongest chess master of the time.

Giovanni Leonardo was studying law in Rome when he was defeated by the Spanish priest Ruy López. Ruy López de Segura was a Spanish priest and later bishop in Segura whose 1561 book Libro de la invención liberal y arte del juego del Axedrez was one of the first definitive books about modern chess in Europe. He moved to Naples, where he lived for a couple of years, as a guest of an uncle with whom he practiced. He had played many times against Paolo Boi in Paolo Boi, considered to have been one of the greatest chess players of the 16th century. They were regarded as being equal in strength.

Back in Cutro he freed his brother, who was kidnapped by the Saracens, defeating the leader of the pirates and winning 200 ducts.

Together with his servant Giulio Cesare Polerio he went to Madrid to challenge the Spanish priest Ruy López. He made a stop in Genoa, where he was a guest in a private home and engaged with the daughter of the owner.

In the summer of 1575 he arrived in Madrid, Leonardo played against Ruy López, Spanish Champion and King’s confessor. Philip II came to know of this young player able to fight with the Spanish champion: Philip made them play at his presence. Leonardo needed at least two wins over their final three games. Leonardo defeated the king’s confessor and Philip II filled him with gifts.

Upon hearing the news of the death of his girlfriend, he left for Portugal where he defeated the Moor, the eminent King Sebastian chess champion. King Sebastian nicknamed him “The wandering knight”.

He died at the court of the Prince of Bisignano, in Naples, poisoned by envy.

Sources: 1 ,2

Topic: Giovanni Leonardo Di Bona,International Master chess champion,Ruy López de Segura,chess,italian history,Philip II

Ennio Morricone and Sergio Leone pose together in the primary school year book

The Oscar-winning composer Ennio Morricone never forgot his friend Sergio Leone, the father of the spaghetti western. Ennio Morricone and Sergio Leone attended primary school together in 1937, in Rome.

Over the years they lost each other’s contact information until 1964 when Sergio Leone hired Ennio to write “For a fistful of dollars” soundtrack. Ennio Morricone wrote the music for all the films directed by Sergio Leone until 1984, year of “Once Upon a Time in America”. In the picture, published on a Facebook fan page dedicated to Sergio Leone, Sergio and Ennio in third grade: starting from the left, Sergio Leone is the second, Ennio Morricone the fourth.

Source

Italian funk at his best: Raffaella Carrá “Rumore”

A badass version of Rumore performed by Raffaella Carrá (1974).

Raffaella Carrà is extremely popular in Italy, Spain, Russia, Turkey and Latin American countries. She is a singer, dancer, actress and tv anchorwoman.

Weird Italy rumore Italian funk at his best: Raffaella Carrá “Rumore” Italian People Magazine Sounds&Music from Italy  video rumore rai raffaella carrá pop music italian funk funk 1974

Lyrics

Rumore, rumore
non mi sento sicura, sicura,
sicura mai
io stasera vorrei
tornare indietro con il tempo.

e ritornare al tempo
che c’eri tu
però perciò
che non pensarci più sù
ma ritornare, ritornare perché
quando ho deciso che facevo da me.

cuore, batti il cuore
na,na,na,na……
mi è sembrato di sentire un rumore, rumore
serà la paura
io da sola non mi sento sicura, sicura
sicura mai, mai,mai, mai
e ti giuro che
stasera vorrei tornare
indietro con il tempo

e ritornare al tempo
che c’eri tu
però perciò
che non pensarci più sù
ma ritornare, ritornare perché
quando ho deciso che facevo da me.

cuore, batti il cuore
na,na,na,na……
rumore, rumore.
rumore, rumore

Ugolino, the Cannibal Count

‘Father our pain’, they said,
‘Will lessen if you eat us you are the one
Who clothed us with this wretched flesh: we plead
For you to be the one who strips it away’.
… And I,
Already going blind, groped over my brood
Calling to them, though I had watched them die,
For two long days. And then the hunger had more
Power than even sorrow over me

        (Canto XXXIII, ln.)

Continue reading Ugolino, the Cannibal Count

Giovanni Aldini: Reanimator

Giovanni Aldini (1762 – 1834) was an Italian physicist born at Bologna, nephew of Luigi Galvani, and he became professor of physics at Bologna in 1798. 

His scientific work was concerned with galvanism and its medical applications and with experiments for preserving human life from destruction by fire.

Continue reading Giovanni Aldini: Reanimator

What is everybody’s natural language ? The cruel experiment in language deprivation of Frederick II

Throughout history were conducted experiments involving language deprivation trying to discover the origin of language.

Continue reading What is everybody’s natural language ? The cruel experiment in language deprivation of Frederick II