Italy: 200 Alpine glaciers gone since end 19th Century

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According to Legambiente, an Italian environmentalist organization, ground snow has been steadily decreasing since 2012.

According to the Italian environmental group Legambiente, 200 Alpine glaciers have vanished since the end of the nineteenth century. “All that remains of them is trash and boulders,” it stated as it unveiled the third edition of its Caravan of the Glaciers, a roving monitoring initiative under the ChangeClimateChange program in collaboration with the Italian Glaciological Committee.

Related article: Drought reveals WWII bomb in Italy’s River Po

The project’s goal is to confirm “the catastrophic retreat of glaciers as a result of the climate catastrophe.”

Italy’s Alpine glaciers are at their narrowest point in millennia, and a serac fall on the Marmolada, the largest in the Dolomites, killed 11 people on July 3. Legambiente also said on Wednesday that Alpine temperatures are rising at double the global rate.

The atmosphere over 3,500 meters is in “complete disequilibrium,” according to the report. Thermal zero was achieved at 5,184 meters in the Swiss Alps at the end of July, according to the organization. According to Legambiente, the Italian Alps experienced an unusually warm and dry winter this year.

It did not rain for 100 days in several locations, according to the report. Ground snow has been steadily declining over the previous decade, with many snow meters reading zero at the start of May. In recent years, the decline of glaciers and other human-caused climate change phenomena has gotten gradually worse.

“Scientific data indicate that global warming is having increasingly rapid and obvious environmental effects in the Alps. – said Marco Giardino, vice president of the Italian Glaciological Committee. “We will be able to directly verify the impressive changes that have occurred in the meantime on some sample glaciers; the comparison with the precious historical data that the Italian Glaciological Committee has been collecting since 1914 in the annual glaciological campaigns will allow us to understand the modalities of change and to evaluate the possibilities response, in terms of mitigation and adaptation “.

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