The New Genoa Bridge Ready for opening two years after tragic collapse

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Ponte Morandi was a bridge in Genoa constructed between 1963 and 1967 along Italy´s A10 motorway over the river Polcevera. 

Related articles: Parco del Ponte in Genoa, the Polcevera Park

On 14 August 2018, a 210 meters section of the viaduct collapsed during a torrential rainstorm killing 43 people, leading to a long period of emergency in the Liguria region.

Weird Italy liguria The New Genoa Bridge Ready for opening two years after tragic collapse Latest Italian News and Videos  liguria Genoa bridge

Eyewitnesses reported that the Ponte Morandi was hit by lightning before it collapsed. A large part of the collapsed viaduct and the vehicles on it fell into the rain-swollen Polcevera.

The new Bridge named Viadotto Genova-San Giorgio, designed by Renzo Piano was finally inaugurated on 3 August 2020.

Construction began on a replacement bridge, on 25 June 2019, and was completed in the spring of 2020. The project includes four lanes and two emergency lanes. Built-in a mixed steel-concrete structure, it is 1,067 meters long and consists of 19 spans supported by 18 elliptical section reinforced concrete stacks with a constant shape.

The new bridge will be constantly monitored by four robots equipped with wheels (with which they will move along the external rails of the viaduct) and articulated arms.

Genoa reacted to pain and isolation with pride, rebuilding a new viaduct in less than two years.

The investigation into private interests and public omissions that led to the crash continues.

The remains of the original bridge were demolished in August 2019. 

At the time of the collapse, the bridge was managed by Atlantia S.p.A., a holding company controlled by the Benetton family. The family waited two days to release a company public statement offering condolences to victims and their families.

The disaster caused a major political controversy about the poor state of infrastructure in Italy.

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